Simple Advice for Fall Plant Sales

Daily announcements of fall plant sales have been filling up my inbox recently.  “Buy now!”, “Huge sale”, these ads say.  My advice is, buy now!  Here’s why:

Huge savings for you.

You benefit with extremely low prices from the company trying to clear out its inventory.  At the nursery where I used to work, we always had huge fall sales with drastic cuts in prices because any plants we had to keep for the winter had to be stored.  Storing all those plants required a lot of labor and work hours for which the company received no profit. Then in the spring, we would have to pull all those plants out of storage again which took a lot of labor and work hours. There is no profit in this for the company, therefore they would rather sell off their inventory at drastically reduced prices than store plants for winter.  Therefore You benefit! As the consumer, you get really really low prices for plants that would have cost you double or even triple the price in the spring.

Fall planting.

If you buy plants at fall sales, it’s still ok to plant them.  In fact, fall is the best time for transplanting many flowers including daylilies, irises, and peonies. Some plants may not look the best because they are no longer actively growing on top but there is still plenty of time for the roots to grow down before winter.  Water the plant well when you plant it (or transplant it) and keep it moist until such time as evening temperatures are at the freezing point and daytime temperatures are cool.  Then stop watering to allow the roots to dry out.  Wet roots rot so you only want the roots to remain moist but not wet for the winter.

In the colder climate zones, cover any new plants or transplants  with leaves, mulch, or straw for the winter to ensure they stay insulated and warm for the winter. Also, when you plant or transplant in the fall, don’t fertilize your plants. You don’t want to encourage new growth.  It may damage or kill your new plant as winter sets in. You want them stop growing and setting in for winter weather.

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Designate an area of the yard for sale plants

For sale plants that don’t have a place in your garden yet, designate an out-of-site area in your yard to heel the plants in for winter and make sure to label them if  necessary so you don’t forget what you bought. Over the winter, you can plan and map out your new garden arrangement. Then in the spring, move your new plants to their designated spot and watch them grow!

Hint: Heeling plants in simply means temporarily planting plants until their permanent planting area is ready.  For a great demonstration of heeling plants in check out this video I found on Youtube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZI6Cb_4AOM

Sales

Take advantage of those plant sales.  It will save you a lot of money in the end and you may even be able to afford that expensive plant you have been coveting but could not afford until now.   Besides, in the spring, think of the fun you get to have creating new areas of the garden without spending a dime!

Happy gardening!

Quote of the Day

“Autumn’s the mellow time.”

-William Allingham, poet

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Planting in Autumn. Time for Tulips!

Yes, Fall is for planting and its right around the corner so its time to start planning.  Fall is the time for planting tulips, daffodils, crocus, hyacinths, alliums, and many, many more beautiful spring-flowering bulbs. Many bulbs must be cooled for a period of time in order to sprout so they need to be planted in Autumn. Over the winter the bulbs are naturally cooled or frozen in the ground and then sprout in the spring when the sun warms the ground. Now is the time to plan for your Fall plantings so your spring garden is bright and beautiful.

Planting bulbs is a very easy process.  When you purchase bulbs,  the bulbs will generally come packed in a bag or box with wood chips, wood fibers, or some other inert absorbent organic material. Planting directions  will be either in or on the package.  Read the directions carefully.  You must plant your bulb at the correct depth or they will not thrive. Bulbs also need to be placed in the ground correctly.  Bulbs have a top and a bottom.  For example, a tulip bulb is pointed on the top (where the greens sprout from) and flatter on the bottom (where the roots will extend from). The bulb will not thrive and may perish if it is not placed in the hole the right way and at the correct depth so make sure you read the instructions before planting so your plants reward your hard work with a fabulous display of color in the spring.

tulip bulbs
photo of tulip bulbs from youcanlearnseries.com

Bone meal is an excellent fertilizer for spring flowering bulbs as it adds phosphorous to the soil which is the nutrient that’s responsible for producing larger and more beautiful flowers.  However, bone meal is exactly what its name implies.  It is made from the bones of slaughtered animals, usually cattle.  It is an organic fertilizer but if you are adverse to using animal remains in your garden, try adding bat guano (bat poo) or poultry/pig manure to your soil.  Manure based fertilizers add phosphorous and nitrogen to the soil. Nitrogen is a necessary nutrient for plants, however, nitrogen encourages the greens of the plant to grow, in detriment to flower production, so limit the amount of nitrogen you add to your soil for your bulbs or you may end up with fabulous greens and no flowers!

Some critters, like squirrels and deer, will dig up or eat your bulbs. Using bone meal as a fertilizer on your bulbs tends to deter herbivores (plant eaters) from digging or munching in the area where you planted your bulbs because of what it is made of.  There are also some manufactured deterrents, in the form of  sprays and granules, that will deter animals from digging or eating your bulbs.  Before purchasing these products, read the directions to understand how to use the product and whether the product is potentially hazardous.  Also be aware that some of these products use foul smelling substances to deter animals so using the product near your home or commonly used area may create a rather obnoxiously fragrant (stinky!) nuisance.

There are also DIY projects that are easy to install that deter animals from digging your bulbs. Chicken wire is an excellent solution, especially for large beds containing bulbs.  Plant your bulbs as normal, covering the bulbs with soil. Then lay chicken wire over the ground on top of the area where the bulbs are planted. Hold the chicken wire down with rocks or other decorative items or place a layer of mulch or dirt over the wire to hide it and hold it down. Animals will not be able to dig through the chicken wire and your bulbs will remain safe and happy tucked away in their new bed.

Another simple way of protecting bulbs is to create or purchase a wire basket with a wire lid that is large enough to hold your bulbs.  Dig a hole in the ground large enough to hold the basket.  Plant the bulbs in the ground inside the basket and close the lid. Hide the lid with a nice layer of mulch or soil.  The bulbs are now planted in the ground safe inside the wire basket away from the wildlife that would love to dig them up.

Bulb cage

Bulb cage DIY project found on http://www.instructables.com/id/Gardeners-underground-bulb-cage/

Fall is coming quickly so start planning now.  It will be so worth it in the spring when your newly planted bulbs flower and that dull corner of your yard glows with radiant color.

As always, have fun and be creative. Gardening is an ongoing experiment. There is no right or wrong. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!

Happy Gardening!

Quote of the Day:

“The fairest thing in nature, a flower, still has its roots in earth and manure.”

– D.H. Lawrence